Fertility

Treatment for infertility in women via Acupuncture and Chinese herbs (TCM) has been available since ancient times.

Women's Health

Acupuncture has been found to be around 90% effective in treating menopause symptoms.

Acupuncture helps to free blocked Qi and to fix imbalanced Qi and can enable the acupuncturist to get to and treat the root cause of the pain.

Stress

Acupuncture has been found to be comparable to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety.

Today's world is stressful. We live in a hectic culture and face many conflicts and challenges in our daily lives.

What to expect on a visit to our office.

The Eight Principles: Interior and Exterior

by Adam Miramon, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.
Published: Pathways Magazine, Spring 2015

Within the practice of Chinese medicine, there are a variety of traditions or schools of thought, and each approaches the preparation of a treatment plan from a slightly different theoretical base. Although each tradition may approach acupuncture or Chinese herbal treatment differently, many of them have a foundation in the Eight Principles. This makes the Eight Principles one of the most prevalent schools of thought in acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. The concept of the Eight Principles dates back to one of the original Chinese medical classics – the Huangdi Neijing, which was published between 475-221 BCE. However, the term “Eight Principles” did not appear in medical texts until the Qing dynasty (1644-1912). The basic theory behind the Eight Principles is founded in the following four dualities:

            Yin                                          Yang
            Interior                                  Exterior
            Cold                                        Hot
            Deficiency                             Excess 

This series of articles will provide a basic understanding of the foundations of Chinese medicine by dissecting one conceptual pair at a time. The last article in the series examined Yin and Yang, and in this article, we will explore Interior and Exterior.

Interior and Exterior

In Chinese medicine, Interior and Exterior refer to the location of the disorder rather than its cause. There are both internal and external causes of disease, but these causes are not considered to be Interior or Exterior when discussing the Eight Principles. When a disease is classified as Interior or Exterior, it directly refers to the location of the disease or pattern of disharmony.

The Eight Principles: Yin and Yang

by Adam Miramon, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.
Published: Pathways Magazine, Winter 2014 

Within the practice of Chinese medicine, there are a variety of traditions or schools of thought, and each approaches the preparation of a treatment plan from a slightly different theoretical base. Although each tradition may approach acupuncture or Chinese herbal treatment differently, many of them have a foundation in the Eight Principles. This makes the Eight Principles one of the most prevalent schools of thought in acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine. The concept of the Eight Principles dates back to one of the original Chinese medical classics – the Huangdi Neijing, which was published between 475-221 BCE. However, the term “Eight Principles” did not appear in medical texts until the Qing dynasty (1644-1912). The basic theory behind the Eight Principles is founded in the following four dualities:

 

            Yin                                          Yang
            Interior                                  Exterior
            Cold                                        Hot
            Deficiency                             Excess 

This series of articles will provide a basic understanding of the foundations of Chinese medicine by dissecting one conceptual pair at a time. The first pair we will explore is Yin and Yang because they are the most fundamental

Yin and Yang

Yin and Yang are believed to have developed from people’s observations of day and night. This alteration between light and dark led to other observations of cycles between two opposite poles or states of being – one receptive (Yin) and one expressive (Yang).  One of the best ways to understand the concept of Yin and Yang is to look at nature – especially in regions where there are four distinct seasons.

Understanding Your Acupuncturist: Organ Functions

by Adam Miramon, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.
Published: Pathways Magazine, Fall 2014 

Continuing the series “Understanding Your Acupuncturist,” we expand the foundation of the concepts behind the theory of acupuncture. Organs play an important role in the human body – both in western medicine and Chinese medicine. A commonly misunderstood concept for individuals not trained in Chinese medicine is that of the organs. As in western medicine, each organ has a specific function. However, these functions may or may not be related to the function of the organ in western medicine. If your acupuncturist mentions the term “Kidney yin deficiency,” this Chinese medical diagnosis does not necessarily indicate that your kidneys are damaged or dysfunctioning through the lens of your western medical physician.

There are twelve primary organs; each with an associated meridian. People with an understanding of human anatomy or some western medical knowledge may recognize the names of most of the organ and meridian pairs. However, there are two additional primary organs in Chinese medicine that may be unfamiliar – the Pericardium and the San Jiao. These two organs will be explained in greater detail later in the article.

Under Chinese medicine, the most common issues with organs and meridians stem from emotional stress and disharmony as well as external pathologies. Although some symptoms of pathology may be similar, the theory of medicine behind how each organ functions are quite different. For example, grief or sadness could indicate a deficiency in any of several organs. Since our bodies do not exist as isolated parts, pathologies in one area can have effects throughout the system. However, these commonalities of pathologies mean that only your acupuncturist can adequately diagnose any issues you may have.

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